Saturday, 12 September 2009

A great place to start with the Easycouncil

The news this week was dominated by a malicious blogger who having insulted the Mayor of Barnet, went running to the Standards Committee when the Mayor gave him a bit of his own medicine. Unlike the legal system where the cost of legal fees discourages this sort of thing, the blogger got the whole thing free, courtesy of the taxpayer.

Maybe this type of case and the numerous other trivial freedom of information act requests, costing hundreds of pounds would be a great place to start with Mike's Easycouncil concept. You could still file silly complaints, you could ask all the questions you like about the cost and thickness of the leaders toilet paper, but you'd have to pay for privildge.

That would save millions up and down the country. Lets face it, who else is served by this ridiculous waste of money, other than malcontents and self publicists who only launch complaints to see themselves on telly

2 comments:

Statler and Waldorf said...

Dear Councillors,

Statler and I are not surprised to see Michael Whitney Freer on this site, which we assume he endorses, further distances himself from David Cameron by calling for restrictions on Freedom of Information and calls for exemption from Councillors from standards codes.

Why is Michael still promoting the 'EasyCouncil' concept, that has been pointedly panned by Boris Johnson, George Osbourne and David Cameron and by Barnet Council's own press office?

And why do you join with Brian Coleman who celebrates with champagne when he is found guilty of breaching the Council's code of conduct he voted for and signed?

With fuzzy hugs,

S&W

askmikefreer said...

I am curious about easy Council. Does Mike diagree with Lynne Hillan. She suggests paying a surcharge to additional services, on the Politics show it was rubbish collection.

Mike is fundamentally opposed to this...

Mike Freer said "The Labour Government should dump this idea, many households are already suffering from the rising costs of living and to charge households to throw away their rubbish will punish families with children by an extra £100 a year more than they currently pay".